Mapping micro-projects in the Western Kenya CDD and Flood Mitigation Project

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Mapping micro-projects in the Western Kenya CDD and Flood Mitigation Project

WKCDD
Western Kenya CDD Projects

The $86 million Western Kenya Community Driven Development and Flood Mitigation (WKCDD) project objective is to empower local communities to engage in sustainable and job creating activities and reduce their vulnerability to flooding, as well as reduce incidence of poverty.

In the fall of 2011, the Government of Kenya, with World Bank support, geo-mapped all of the sub-projects in the WKCDD and featured the map on the project website.  Each of the 350+ sub-projects is depicted on a web-based map.  Click on the dot representing a sub-project, and then a person viewing the map can see the sub-project name, category, funding, and contact information. The mapping platform also has the capability to include photos and videos of each sub-project, and the project is in the process of capturing and uploading these.

The objective of the mapping work initially was to map the locations, activities, funding of sub-projects to enhance performance, transparency, and citizen participation as well as to test an enhanced model of project supervision.

The mapping initiative is part of a broader effort by the GOK and World Bank to enhance governance in Kenya projects involving decentralized expenditures in communities and service facilities, partly in response to issues that have arisen in audits conducted by the Government of Kenya on several local level development projects. The WKCDD project experience shows that mapping can be done efficiently and at high quality by the Government project team itself, even with limited resources. More than 90% of the sub-projects have been mapped. Drawing on technical assistance provided by the WB social accountability team and WBI’s Mapping for Results initiative, WKCDD project team members visited each sub-project, gathered basic geo-coordinates and categories, uploaded the information onto a map over the course of 2-3 weeks in the fall of 2011. They used motor bikes to transverse into villages. This reduced the costs further.

By making small sub-projects more visible, mapping not only can enhances transparency and monitoring of funds, but it can also improve project impact. . Mapping also makes it possible to easily see the spatial distribution of all the sub-projects in a specific category (e.g., bee-keeping, dairy, fish farming), which in turn can enable more strategic deployment of extension and marketing services. This also opens the door for more targeted information sharing and competition between sub-projects in a particular sub-category. 

Further work is underway to embed geo-mapping into the fabric of the WKCDD project, by linking it to the project’s management information system and to project team responsibilities, and to link it with community feedback.   Sensitization workshops have been held with project team members and representatives of local CSOs and communities – and a number of mechanisms will be tested to use the maps to share information and elicit community feedback.  

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